Dr. Moffat’s NATURAL HEALTH TECHNIQUES NEWSLETTER

Newsletter banner 2014

Volume 10 No. 2 July, 2014 Newsletter

In This Issue:

  • Client Testimonial on Headaches in a child
  • What’s New at Our House

Client Testimonials: Headaches in an autistic child resolving:

Dr. Moffat, we just realized that our little girl hasn’t complained about headaches in a little bit—what a difference! It was multiple times a day every day for a while. She still puts her finger in her nose (and mouth, but that’s another issue), but now It’s more like a quick, discreet, itching or rubbing, not the prolonged exploratory boring that she was doing repeatedly and continually all day long before. Amazing! I think it might be the three new supplements (Pituitrophin, cell salts and tryptophan). Wow! She just turned 4 last month and within a month of her birthday lost both front teeth too. So shifts are happening. Ahhhh. Just wanted to share the happy news.

(Denice’s Note: this little girl also has sleep issues but they are slowly improving. This case will be a long-term manipulation of a custom diet/supplement program until her hormones stabilize. Of course I’m holding out for mainstreaming back into her actual age class. We’ll keep working at it.)

What’s new at our House:

Michael and I went to a cob building workshop in Coquille, OR this last April in hopes that we will someday build some of the structures here at Elk Meadow Farm out of cob.

Cob Garden Wall

Cob Garden Wall at Cob Cottage, Coquille OR.

Here’s a photo of one of the cob walls at Cob Cottage

New Guinea Hog

We fell in love with the baby New Guinea Piglets.

We both fell in love with Tammy Van’s New Guinea Hogs which have longer (soft!) coats and graze more than tunnel in their pens.

It was a nice break before coming home to the 523 trees and shrubs in pots that needed to be planted in the ground. I ended up planting about half of them before the food growing season kicked in. We had a neighbor volunteer to topple 4 gigantic trees which open up a slot for our permaculture orchard project. The giant pumpkins are in the ground if you haven’t already been keeping up with that on our farm Facebook page. I built a raised bed maze for mine and filled in the ditches with rabbit manure and then topped that with straw so I wouldn’t compact the areas the vines are growing on by walking in between them to attend to excess flowers and unnecessary baby  pumpkins.

Giant Pumpkin vine

Dr. Moffat’s Giant Pumpkin Vine 2014.

We ended up planting 75 pumpkin plants this year (Lord help us!) Here’s a photo of the Three Sisters patch on Pad 4 about a week ago:

Three Sisters Patch

75 pumpkins in front of the Hopi corn with beans planted around the corn.

I finally completed the keyhole gardens in the back yard and discovered we needed a new roof when I was up there taking photos of the beds. Drats.

Keyhole gardens

South side keyhole gardens. Elk Meadow Farm & Nursery, 2014.

With bank loan in hand the contractor has set us up for the end of September. We’ve decided on a metal roof as one step closer to our rainwater treatment system goal. Our Indian Runner ducks hatched out 9 of the 35 duck eggs before they left their nest. We’re down to 6 ducks total and that’s enough. I finally gathered all my left-handed gloves up and made an art project out of them. Never could find a left-handed gardener who wanted to exchange right-handed gloves for non-holey left ones. Oh well. . .never let the left hand know what the right one is doing.

Left Handed Gloves

Left Handed Glove Art, 2014.

We ordered 48 new chickens to pump up the older flock and they have been integrated to the big pen. Michael did some earth moving in their pen so we could plant more chicken-edible fare come fall. The raspberries are coming on gangbusters.

Raspberries and Tayberries

Raspberries and Tayberries.

We pick about 2-3 gallons of them and Tayberries about every other day and tonight we just harvested 5 gallons of Lodi apples from just one tree. I’ve yet to eek out some time to process collards, kales, chard, beets and pea pods but I did get the broccoli in.  It’s 99 degrees today so we’ve been spending way more time just trying to keep the plants alive rather than continuing projects in between office calls. It’s really hot. Thank goodness it’s dry heat.

Hope you all are having a great, relaxing summer and spending time with the people who love and appreciate you most. Be well. Denice

  • Dr. Denice Moffat
  • 1069 Elk Meadow Lane
  • Deary, ID 83823 (208) 877-1222
  • [email protected]

To read about me and how I work (and costs): https://naturalhealthtechniques.com/medical-intuitive-what-i-do.htm