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NHT News Vol. 11 No. 3 November 12, 2015

Dr. Moffat’s NATURAL HEALTH TECHNIQUES NEWSLETTER

In This Issue:

  • From the Desk of Dr. Moffat: Black Friday Special is coming up!
  • Health in the News: NSAIDS
  • Product of the Month: Sage
  • Ask Dr. Moffat: I have some kind of worms. Can you help?
  • Tips and Tricks for a Healthier Life Lemon Rind to Smoothies
  • Client Testimonials: Visceral Manipulation
  • What’s New at Our House? We’re watching our neighbors

(Please note that full names are never used in this newsletter or on my website without the full consent of the sender or client. Some cases also encompass groupings of cases with similar symptoms and suggestions for healing in an attempt to educate the general public.)

From the Desk of Dr. Moffat:

Just a couple of weeks to go for our 5th Annual Black Friday 50% Off Consults special. Please tell your friends. An unbeatable deal and my favorite time of the year to catch up on the lives of my clients: https://naturalhealthtechniques.com/annual-black-friday-special/ 

Health in the News: NSAIDS in the News:   

Michael and I get quite a few magazines, journals and literature every month and it seems this month’s biggest splash in the news is about Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory agents (NSAIDS for short).

It seems that the FDA is requiring more stringent words of caution for both prescribed and over the counter NSAIDS. Tylenol PM was in the news last month as a common cause for the acceleration of dementia. Read more. . .

Product of the Month: Sage (Salvia officinalis

Photo of common sage (Salvia officinalis).

Photo of common sage (Salvia officinalis).

Reference for Sage pictures:

Sage is an evergreen. It can grow up to 32 in. The stems are square and hairy that end in leaves that can range in color from gray (white), green, purple, blue and pink and white. Giving a clue to its medicinal use is Sage’s botanical name “Salvia” which is Latin meaning ‘to cure’. Sage is grown all around the world but is native to the Mediterranean. It is grown from seed or cuttings from an established plant and thrives in sunny conditions. The leaves are harvested during the summer and the plants replaced every 3-4 years. Purple Sage is preferred as the medicinal variety. White sage is used for purification ceremonies and smudging to energetically clear spaces. Common sage is most commonly found as a culinary herb and is used in cooking especially in sausage, stuffing, soups and stews. Sage was awarded the International Herb Association “Herb of the Year” in 2001. Read more about Sage. . . 

Ask Dr. Moffat:  

Dear Dr. Moffat: I believe I have parasites inside of me, and I recently discovered I had demodex mites . . . the mites seem to have gone away from my body after hours of scrubbing my eye brows and removing lots of body hair . . .

However, there is a room upstairs that appears to have some left over parasite/mite in there, and every time I enter, they attack me in large numbers and I take multiple showers to get them off of me.

My wife and kids are not affected, although last night my wife was assisting me with that room as mentioned above, and I know they were on her b/c back in our room they were jumping to me, almost as if my pheromones are sending a signal out.

While treating the mites, I used anti-fungal cream and it got on my arms and neck, which is when I noticed little black worms or parasites coming out of my skin.   I believe this is the primary issue with me, and the mites are a secondary reaction, alerting me that my immune system is low… John B.

Dear John B: Demodex is normally in the skin of many, many people and it doesn’t cause symptoms. They don’t jump. And they would not go from one human to another. They crawl and it wouldn’t happen that fast. Fleas would bite your ankles though if you’re walking into the room. Are you seeing bites? What I suspect here is Morgellons disease. Have you heard of this already? Here’s what I know about it: https://naturalhealthtechniques.com/morgellons-disease/ 

Tips and Tricks for a Healthier Life  

Lemon Rind to Smoothies: Adding 1/3 Lemon with the rind to your morning smoothie will cut the bitter green taste of the veggies. Lemon peel also contains rutin (a Vitamin C) that will help to make the blood vessels stronger so that it cuts down on bruising (an issue with older people and people on coumadin or Blood Type O people who take synthetic Vitamin E in gel caps—which they are not really supposed to do.)

Client testimonials: Visceral Manipulation referral results

Sarah, a client of mine with chronic digestive disturbances had reached a plateau with what we could accomplish in the areas of diet, homeopathy, supplementation and emotional release work. She had been getting regular massages but, even though they were relaxing, it wasn’t helping her digestive issues. I suggested visceral manipulation massage which she had never heard of. Fortunately she lived in an area of the United States large enough to sustain several practitioners, so I asked her to send me the names of the ones in her area for me to muscle test which practitioner would be for the highest and best good for her body and be in a vibrational level for results. This is her email to me after her first treatment with the visceral manipulator. . .

Hi Denice, I had the treatment yesterday afternoon and was blown away by it. The practitioner, Jon, told me I was a visceral practitioner’s dream case! He started working on the areas that my body told him needed working on first. He did work on my brain and hypothalamus. I remember that one function that wasn’t responding was that which controls satiation and another was sleep.

All but one of the sphincters and valves were either not functioning or frozen. The ileocecal valve was the one that was functioning ok. He got those functioning again. He is going to show me how to do some of the manipulations myself next time. The gallbladder was in spasm and was inflamed, so he worked on that, and he worked on my right kidney. He also talked about how my gallbladder, stomach and liver were taking energy from each other. I think my gallbladder was taking it from the liver and the stomach taking it from the gallbladder….

At the end of the session he tested my body to see what wanted treating next time and my stomach came up. He tested that I need to wait 3 weeks before having another treatment.

I do feel so much better than before I went and I am amazed at the treatment, but I am still bloating and I am not sure why! I did eat a couple of teaspoons of cashew nut butter (which I don’t normally eat) before bedtime and I had a few soaked cashews, along with other nuts, in my breakfast smoothie. The bloating began an hour after the smoothie. Are you able to test why I’m still bloating?

Thank you so, so much for my last session. You have done so much for me already! Have a lovely weekend, Sarah

So what IS Visceral Manipulation? Read more about Visceral Manipulation in the next issue:

What’s New at Our House? 

The first snow arrived at our house since the last newsletter. It’s a mad dash to get the last few plants of the food forest planted and tools put away. We ended up working in the snow building fence to put the final touches on our chicken pen so that I could plant a row of thornless blackberries and Marion berries before the weather set in.

We’re watching neighbors very closely now that Thanksgiving is approaching. They are taking a special interest in Mimi and Sophia, our Blue Slate turkeys.

“Say. . .it’s getting close to Thanksgiving. Would you miss one of those turkeys?” asked one neighbor who came to our place to rummage through our tire stash for a used tire for one of his vehicles.

“Yes! And we know where you live.” I answered. In a lively conversation on our farm Facebook page his daughter shared that “she knew this neighbor and she wouldn’t cook our turkey even if it was offered to her for Thanksgiving.”  I  love this girl–a fellow giant pumpkin grower. 🙂

The girls seem clueless to the extra attention. They have found our bedroom window so fly down from the tree area which I pruned up especially for their nighttime perching to ask for their daily slice of bread. Gobble gobble.

Mimi and Sophia the turkeys

Sophia and Mimi–our GrandTurkeys. They wander around the farm and no, we’re not going to eat them.

All is well here except that I’m trying to put this newsletter up between solar flares which keeps shutting me down and deleting my work! Grrr. Be well.